Gen Z Graduates Into A New World Of Work, Here Is Why You Should Care

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, I research & write on longevity, generational trends & innovation. Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own.

LOS ANGELES, CA – MAY 11: Media producer Oprah Winfrey addresses The USC Annenberg School For Communication And Journalism Celebrates Commencement at The Shrine Auditorium on May 11, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Leon Bennett/Getty Images)

</div> </div> <p>Generation Z, the leading edge of young people born after 1997, are now 21 years old. Many of them are graduating from college and listening to the well wishes and advice of graduation speakers. After the microphones are silenced and the last diploma is awarded, Gen Z will enter the workforce.</p> <p>Today’s workplace is undergoing an unprecedented rate of change placing new demands on workers of all ages. A new <em>high velocity workplace</em> is emerging – a world of work characterized by the rapid development of new knowledge, an accelerating rate of industry disruption and advancing technology.</p> <p>Graduation speakers are asking students <em>to be daring</em>, <em>to hone personal resilience</em> and more. My personal favorite is a <a href="https://www.npr.org/2018/05/25/614518550/from-oprah-to-rex-tillerson-commencement-speeches-for-the-class-of-2018" target="_blank" data-ga-track="ExternalLink:https://www.npr.org/2018/05/25/614518550/from-oprah-to-rex-tillerson-commencement-speeches-for-the-class-of-2018" rel="nofollow">speech</a>, a mixture of practical and aspirational guidance, delivered by Oprah Winfrey to University of Southern California graduates. She advised the class of 2018 to “eat breakfast…make your bed…recycle…pay your bills on time…and to aim high.”</p> <p> </p> <p>But, in the <a href="https://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/billyjoel/preludeangryyoungman.html" target="_blank" data-ga-track="ExternalLink:https://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/billyjoel/preludeangryyoungman.html" rel="nofollow">words</a> of another Baby Boomer, Billy Joel, not from a podium, but in song, sometimes “just surviving is a noble fight.”</p> <p>Surviving <em>and thriving</em> in the emerging high velocity workplace will require Gen Z graduates to confront the new realities of work – realities that are changing the rules of work for all generations. Here are four.</p>

<p><strong>School Is Never Out</strong></p> <p>Sorry graduates. You thought final exams were…well, <em>final</em>. The half-life of education is perhaps shorter than any previous generation perhaps placing&nbsp;Gen Z at a higher risk for professional obsolescence in fewer years than&nbsp;even the Millennials.</p> <p>Buckminster Fuller coined the idea of <a href="https://www.bfi.org/search?search_api_views_fulltext=knowledge+doubling+curve" target="_blank" data-ga-track="ExternalLink:https://www.bfi.org/search?search_api_views_fulltext=knowledge+doubling+curve" rel="nofollow">knowledge doubling</a> which suggests that knowledge, in a given field or human endeavor, doubles at a predictable, but accelerating rate. Fuller argued that in 1900 human knowledge doubled about every 100 years and by 1950 knowledge doubled every 25 years. A 2006 IBM <a href="http://www-935.ibm.com/services/no/cio/leverage/levinfo_wp_gts_thetoxic.pdf" target="_blank" data-ga-track="ExternalLink:http://www-935.ibm.com/services/no/cio/leverage/levinfo_wp_gts_thetoxic.pdf" rel="nofollow">study</a> forecasted that human knowledge might be doubling every 11 hours! Today it is widely accepted that knowledge doubles, but at different rates in different fields. Medical education provides a startling example. One researcher projects that by 2020 medical knowledge might double every 73 days.</p>” readability=”50.2899262899″>

LOS ANGELES, CA – MAY 11: Media producer Oprah Winfrey addresses The USC Annenberg School For Communication And Journalism Celebrates Commencement at The Shrine Auditorium on May 11, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Leon Bennett/Getty Images)

Generation Z, the leading edge of young people born after 1997, are now 21 years old. Many of them are graduating from college and listening to the well wishes and advice of graduation speakers. After the microphones are silenced and the last diploma is awarded, Gen Z will enter the workforce.

Today’s workplace is undergoing an unprecedented rate of change placing new demands on workers of all ages. A new high velocity workplace is emerging – a world of work characterized by the rapid development of new knowledge, an accelerating rate of industry disruption and advancing technology.

Graduation speakers are asking students to be daring, to hone personal resilience and more. My personal favorite is a speech, a mixture of practical and aspirational guidance, delivered by Oprah Winfrey to University of Southern California graduates. She advised the class of 2018 to “eat breakfast…make your bed…recycle…pay your bills on time…and to aim high.”

But, in the words of another Baby Boomer, Billy Joel, not from a podium, but in song, sometimes “just surviving is a noble fight.”

Surviving and thriving in the emerging high velocity workplace will require Gen Z graduates to confront the new realities of work – realities that are changing the rules of work for all generations. Here are four.

School Is Never Out

Sorry graduates. You thought final exams were…well, final. The half-life of education is perhaps shorter than any previous generation perhaps placing Gen Z at a higher risk for professional obsolescence in fewer years than even the Millennials.

Buckminster Fuller coined the idea of knowledge doubling which suggests that knowledge, in a given field or human endeavor, doubles at a predictable, but accelerating rate. Fuller argued that in 1900 human knowledge doubled about every 100 years and by 1950 knowledge doubled every 25 years. A 2006 IBM study forecasted that human knowledge might be doubling every 11 hours! Today it is widely accepted that knowledge doubles, but at different rates in different fields. Medical education provides a startling example. One researcher projects that by 2020 medical knowledge might double every 73 days.

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