IBM’s cloud CTO: ‘We’re in this game to win’

IBM saw from the get-go that the cloud was going to cause a major disruption to its business.

“We knew it was a massive opportunity for IBM, but not in a way that necessarily fit our mold,” said Jim Comfort, who is now CTO for IBM Cloud. “Every dimension of our business model would change — we knew that going in.”

Change they have, and there’s little denying that the cloud businesses is now a ray of sunshine brightening IBM’s outlook as its legacy businesses struggle. In its second-quarter earnings report last week, cloud revenue was up 30 percent for the quarter year over year, reaching $ 11.6 billion. Revenue from systems hardware and operating systems software, on the other hand, was down more than 23 percent.

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IBM’s cloud and data analytics grow as overall revenue slides

IBM’s revenue continued to decline in the second quarter but growth in some of its strategic initiatives like cloud computing and data analytics suggest that the company may be on track in its transition plans.

The Armonk, New York, company said Monday that revenue from its new “strategic imperatives” like cloud, analytics and security increased by 12 percent year-on-year to $ 8.3 billion. That increase was, however, lower than the growth the company had reported in these businesses in the first quarter.

Cloud revenue – public, private and hybrid – grew 30 percent in the second quarter, while revenue from analytics grew 4 percent, revenue from mobile increased 43 percent and the security business grew 18 percent.

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Cloud Computing

IBM’s Watson gets smarter with upgraded speech, language and vision APIs for developers

IBM has announced that its cognitive intelligence platform Watson has been upgraded with speech, vision and language capabilities, allowing developers to to build smarter apps. On the language side of things, IBM says Watson can now understand ambiguous language in text through a few different modules. The IBM Watson Natural Language Classifier understands meaning, while IBM Watson Dialog makes for more natural app interactions by tailoring language to the style used by a person asking a question. Perhaps more interestingly than that though, the new Visual Insights capabilities promise to allow developers to glean insights from images and videos on…

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