Facebook Friends With Your Co-Workers? Survey Shows Your Boss Probably Disapproves

You and your colleagues pitch in together on difficult projects, lunch together, and have drinks together after work. You probably think it’s the most natural thing in the world to friend them on Facebook or follow them on Twitter or Instagram. Your boss, though, probably thinks you shouldn’t.

That’s the surprising result of a survey of 1,006 employees and 307 senior managers conducted by staffing company OfficeTeam. Survey respondents were asked how appropriate it was to connect with co-workers on various social media platforms. It turns out that bosses and their employees have very different answers to this question.

When it comes to Facebook, 77 percent of employees thought it was either “very appropriate” or “somewhat appropriate” to be Facebook friends with your work colleagues, but only 49 percent of senior managers agreed. That disagreement carries over to other social media platforms. Sixty-one percent of employees thought it was fine to follow a co-worker on Twitter, but only 34 percent of bosses agreed. With Instagram, 56 percent of employees, but only 30 percent of bosses thought following a co-worker was appropriate. Interestingly, the one social platform bosses and employees seem to almost agree about is Snapchat, with 34 percent of employees thinking it was fine to connect with colleagues, and 26 percent of bosses thinking so too.

What should you do if you want to connect with a colleague on social media–if you get a connection request from a colleague? Here are a few options:

1. Use LinkedIn.

LinkedIn was not included in the OfficeTeam survey, but because it’s a professional networking tool, few bosses will object to you connecting with coworkers there. And LinkedIn has many of the same features as Facebook–you can even send instant messages to your contacts.

2. Keep your social media connections secret.

Most social networks give users the option to limit who can see what they post and who their other connections are. You can use this option to keep your social media interactions limited to the people you choose. If that doesn’t include your boss, he or she may never know that you and your co-workers are connected.

3. Talk to your boss.

He or she may not agree with the surveyed bosses who said connecting on social media was inappropriate, in which case there’s no problem. And if your boss does object, he or she may have some good reasons you hadn’t thought of to keep your professional life separate from your social media one. The only way to find out is to ask.

4. Consider the future.

It may be perfectly fine to connect with your co-workers on social media when you’re colleagues. But what happens if you get promoted to a leadership position? You may regret giving your former co-workers access to all the thoughts you share on Facebook or Twitter. So if a colleague sends you a social media request, or you want to make one yourself, take a moment to think it through. Will you be sorry one day–when you’re the boss yourself?

Tech

Research Shows That Companies That Do This One Thing Increase Worker Productivity by 25%

When we think productivity, we rarely think of workplace design as a major contributor or detractor, but compelling ongoing research shows that it plays a much larger role than initially thought. According to research published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology, an empowered office environment can increase worker productivity on cognitive tasks by 25%, and possibly more.

Workspace design today is undergoing a major creative shift. We’ve gone from cubicles (people are productive in isolation) to open-plan spaces (collaboration leads to success) to what I believe is the next major step – integrated multi-function design which recognizes that people need multiple spaces based on their ongoing and changing needs within a business day.

Instead of looking out across rows of cubicles, today’s office worker needs a mix of team meeting rooms, open lounge-like areas, and private workspaces.

This is the “empowered office” – an office in which workers can choose their work environment. It’s a design concept that’s gaining traction – and not only because it creates more pleasant workspaces. It also has a powerful influence on worker productivity.

Great office design isn’t just for startups anymore

Major tech companies and Silicon Valley startups were among the first to embrace the concept of the empowered office. The New York Times recently highlighted Microsoft for its forward-thinking office designs, which incorporate everything from “isolation rooms,” or soundproof private spaces, to comfy central lounges with large tables and couches.

What’s really exciting, however, is that this way of thinking about space – specifically, about the ways that spaces influence behavior – is becoming more mainstream.  

“The great thing we are seeing, as far as transformative spaces in the workplace, is that these principles are being adopted across all disciplines – all fields and industries,” says Architectural Designer Jared Skinner, co-founder at MADE Design. “Companies are realizing that these best practices are bolstering not only creative collaboration – often seen as a soft skill, but productivity and results. It’s impacting the bottom line.”

Striking the perfect balance between privacy and collaboration

When it comes to progressive, transformative workspaces. some of the most successful companies have been the ones that aren’t afraid to experiment.

At Microsoft, for example, designers began testing open team workspaces in one specific area in one building. Through experimentation, they learned that the spaces they’d started with were too open – they were built for 16 to 24 software engineers, and those who worked in them found them to be too loud and distracting.

Working with that knowledge, Microsoft then adjusted those team spaces till they held just 8 to 12 engineers, which the company – and more importantly, the employees – believe to be ideal.

To achieve higher productivity, then, companies must embrace the need for creativity and flexibility. They must allow themselves to try out new configurations and change them as needed, adding in more private spaces, perhaps, or bringing in standing desks, or creating smaller collaborative work stations.  

Workspace design must embrace our digital, connected reality

Just as today’s consumers are constantly connected, so are today’s workers. What’s more, they’re mobile – work no longer has to be tied to a desk or an office.

When designing workspaces, it’s crucial to take these realities into account. But it takes more than an espresso machine or a pingpong table to make your workspace truly progressive, and thereby productive. If you’re not baking the principles of empowerment, connectedness, and mobility into your office design at its most basic level, then you can easily end up with a workspace that feels gimmicky and disingenuous.

That’s not to mention that you won’t be reaping the real productivity benefits of empowered office design.

Integrated design is a must for attracting talent – especially among Millennials and Gen Z

Millennials and members of Generation Z take connectivity for granted in their workspaces, so companies that want to truly stay ahead of the pack must go further.

We need to create designs that engage members of these generations. This isn’t the old model of engagement, either – Millennials and Gen Zers have a completely unique approach to engaging with spaces that’s based on more than just technology. To be successful, companies must keep these new sensibilities in mind as they design or renovate their workspaces.

This shift in workplace design is both responding to and influencing the new ways we’re defining work in the digital age. It’s an incredibly exciting time to be working at the intersection of design and branding, as we do at MADE.

To quote my co-founder, Jared Skinner, once more: “We’re living in an evolve-or-die day and age. Smart companies are being proactive and taking initiative to welcome this much-needed change.”

Tech

Oracle Corporation (ORCL) Strong Q4 Shows Traction in Cloud Business: Analyst

The company is faced with an uphill task in the cloud computing business as competition is likely to get tougher and driving meaningful growth might …


RSS-4

Business needs education in cloud value and security, study shows

While a majority (77%) of organisations trust cloud computing more than a year ago, just 13% trust public cloud providers to secure sensitive data, …


Cloud Computing

Get ready to watch all your favorite TV shows in virtual reality

Netflix-living-room

Feed-twFeed-fb

Hulu and Netflix are jumping on the virtual reality train. All aboard, early adopters.

Both streaming video services will soon offer virtual reality apps that let users explore content and watch what they want in 3D virtual spaces. Netflix is up first, with an app launching in the Gear VR store on Thursday, just hours after it was announced on stage at Oculus Connect.

While the video itself plays inside the headset on a virtual screen — banish all hopes of stepping into your favorite TV show or movie, at least for now — the app’s browsing interface is an interactive “Netflix Living Room.” This is a valuable feather in Netflix’s cap, marking the “first” subscription video app for VR and yet another platform for the ubiquitous service. Read more…

More about Entertainment, Gaming, Netflix, Hulu, and Television


RSS-3

Get ready to watch all your favorite TV shows in virtual reality

Netflix-living-room

Feed-twFeed-fb

Hulu and Netflix are jumping on the virtual reality train. All aboard, early adopters.

Both streaming video services will soon offer virtual reality apps that let users explore content and watch what they want in 3D virtual spaces. Netflix is up first, with an app launching in the Gear VR store on Thursday, just hours after it was announced on stage at Oculus Connect.

While the video itself plays inside the headset on a virtual screen — banish all hopes of stepping into your favorite TV show or movie, at least for now — the app’s browsing interface is an interactive “Netflix Living Room.” This is a valuable feather in Netflix’s cap, marking the “first” subscription video app for VR and yet another platform for the ubiquitous service. Read more…

More about Entertainment, Gaming, Netflix, Hulu, and Television


RSS-3

RSS-3

Get ready to watch all your favorite TV shows in virtual reality

Netflix-living-room

Feed-twFeed-fb

Hulu and Netflix are jumping on the virtual reality train. All aboard, early adopters.

Both streaming video services will soon offer virtual reality apps that let users explore content and watch what they want in 3D virtual spaces. Netflix is up first, with an app launching in the Gear VR store on Thursday, just hours after it was announced on stage at Oculus Connect.

While the video itself plays inside the headset on a virtual screen — banish all hopes of stepping into your favorite TV show or movie, at least for now — the app’s browsing interface is an interactive “Netflix Living Room.” This is a valuable feather in Netflix’s cap, marking the “first” subscription video app for VR and yet another platform for the ubiquitous service. Read more…

More about Entertainment, Gaming, Netflix, Hulu, and Television


RSS-3

RSS-3

The FAA’s Official App Shows Where It’s Legal To Fly a Drone

When I first set out to fly some hobby drones, I had no idea where to go. I had to scour the web to figure out where I could fly without getting into trouble. Even then, I found precious little info. The FAA’s new iPhone app sounds exactly like what I was looking for.

Read more…



Uncategorized